Meet Victor

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People with intellectual disabilities are three to four times more likely to experience mental illness. Victor wants to end the stigma once and for all:

 

 

Our new module ‘Mental Health’ captures the experiences and perspectives of leading thinkers to offer a comprehensive insight into mental health.

 

 

YOUR STAFF WILL LEARN HOW TO:

– understand mental health.

– support a mental health difficulty.

– help people cope with difficult situations and emotions.

– protect and promote mental health.

 

DID YOU KNOW THAT YOU CAN USE OPEN FUTURE …

– with groups of staff.

– on your phone.

– with the people you support.

 

Schedule a demo and then you can get your first month free! No contract. Email for more information: hello@openfuturelearning.org

 

Learn more about all of our modules here.

 

Do you have permission to touch disabled people?

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Do your support staff seek permission before they touch people? Our members use us to create better support relationships. Watch this video:

 

 

Our new module ‘Personal and Intimate Care’ offers several very practical strategies that can be used to seek permission even when people do not use words to speak.

 

Parallel talk is one such example. Parallel talk simply means describing your actions before and as you take them. It can be as simple as: “I’m just going to reach over for the shaving foam…okay I’m ready to start by helping you wet your face…now are you ready for me to carry on?” The key is ensuring the person is always aware of what is happening well before it happens. A key word, phrase or behavior can indicate someone’s choice. Many people give permission without speech – it could be their facial expression, their posture or simply their gaze. So you wait for their response, then move on.

 

In the busyness of our work we can forget about humanity really fast. Parallel talk slows us down and reestablishes that connection. Plus when combined with a routine that all staff follow, it can encourage learning. Every time you describe what you do, the individual gets to hear and experience the routine. Without knowing it, learning starts happening and at that point even people with profound disabilities will start to participate in the routine.

 

Preserving dignity and promoting control are two of the most important tasks a support staff person undertakes. Why? Because we expect it ourselves.

 

DID YOU KNOW THAT YOU CAN USE OPEN FUTURE …

– with groups of staff.

– on your phone.

– with the people you support.

 

Schedule a demo and then you can get your first month free! No contract. Email for more information: hello@openfuturelearning.org

 

Learn more about all of our modules here.

 

Happy holidays?

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For most of us, the busy holiday season means time to entertain, party and enjoy some down time with friends and family. But for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, it can be an intensely lonely time of the year when the social isolation they already experience only gets worse. Imagine if the only people you saw over Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year were those paid to support you?

 

Friendships – all year round, not just in the holidays – as Open Future contributor and self-advocate Steve Dymond says, are crucial:

 

“It’s important for me to have friends because without friends you haven’t got anyone else you can rely on. It’s a good feeling to know you have some people there if you need them. It’s all about sharing experiences and sharing different things between each other.”

 

Open Future Learning strongly believes that the support staff person’s most important role is to help people to develop and maintain friendships. Community and friendships help us to live longer and happier lives, yet a recent review of research showed that 50% of people we support experience chronic loneliness.

 

As Open Future contributor David Pitonyak says in this film: “Nothing is more important than building meaningful and enduring relationships.”

Helping people to connect with others in their communities can seem like a daunting task. Open Future contributor Margaret Cushen says a community mapping exercise is one way to start building connections, just by writing down or photographing local places and activities that are – or could be – important to someone.

 

Leading thinker Beth Mount adds:

 

“We have to know people’s communities inside and out. We go into community as an explorer. What are the assets of this place, what do people need done here, what do people need help with, where are the opportunities to contribute? Talk to people, go explore! Find out what is here in this place and how that might be a world that someone with a disability can bring and offer something.”

To build and connect someone to new friendships most successfully means being the kind of support worker who recognizes they are not at the center of things. Instead, their role is clearly to help people take control of their own lives as active members of the community. “As a support worker,” says Open Future contributor Jack Pearpoint “it’s really important for you not to create dependency…a key role is to expand the network of support, build the circle of friends, and engage people in the community.”

 

It is worth bearing in mind the basic tasks of good support as developed by John O’Brien which are as pertinent now as they were almost 40 years ago when they were first developed. To help people become full citizens, John said, the first step is to discover their gifts and interests, create opportunities in community and help people share those gifts.

 

One story David Pitonyak tells is about once working with a young man called Roland. Roland was very aggressive, but he and David made a connection. Returning to his shift one evening in Vermont, he noticed Roland had left the home without anyone noticing. David eventually found Roland tramping through the snow walking towards his house. David recalls:

 

“I realized that an essential place of Roland’s suffering is that he didn’t have anybody in his life. We knew he experienced autism; we knew he was aggressive. But nobody had ever noticed that he had no people that he wanted to be with.”

 

David shares that he used his close and trusted relationship with Roland to help Roland to explore and experience things he had never tried before. David explains that it wasn’t long before Roland was making expansive lists detailing all the things he wanted to do and all the people he wanted to see in a day.

 

As David says, relationships are critical to our wellbeing. Having something to look forward to helps us cope better with our daily lives. “A lot of people who experience disability don’t have that much to look forward to…I really believe we should help people find more joy in their lives”.

 

And what better time to find that joy than this holiday season.

 

Learn more about the module ‘Building Friendships and Community’ and all of the Open Future Learning modules here.

 

Please email hello@openfuturelearning.org to schedule a free demo and trial.